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Saturday, May 17, 2014

Spring in North Idaho - Part 3

Arrowleaf Balsamroot

Now the more intense colored wildflowers arrive. Though there are still pastels.

Long-leaved Phlox and Wild Mustard
Wild Rose

Nuttall's Larkspur
The fruit trees are in full bloom. Every year I think the old plum tree has seen her last, but she looks especially lovely this year.


And does the old pear tree.



And even the very old apple tree that crashed to the ground last autumn, still has some living branches with blooms. Poor old thing.

Last fall with apples. This spring with apple blossoms on at least one branch.

Interesting, how some apple trees have pink blossoms, others large white blossoms (different types, of course)



Two white women (as opposed to Native American) have lived on this property.  Daffodils planted by Mom, who lived here 1951 - 2007 still bloom beside the creek.


And Alma Cable, who lived on the property during the first half of the 20th century planted pheasant-eyed jonquils, which are still blooming on a bank across from where her house stood.


I may have over-done the photos today, but Jay and I are off to the highlands of Scotland, so I wanted to get it all in before the flowers are gone for the season. 

Sunday, May 4, 2014

Spring in North Idaho - Part 2




The large serviceberry bush is blooming in front of our house on the hill.  Here's a close-up.



My favorite wildflower  is the shooting star, which we always called the love dart. Has a lovely scent, too.



The yellow bell was difficult to find when we were children out picking flowers. But this is one of three I found just beyond the house last week.


Walking up the trail behind the house . . . 


 I came upon this woodland flower, whose name I've never known, my flower guide with blurry photos being of little help. It shall remain a lovely mystery.


 But the wild strawberries are in bloom. Maybe this year I'll beat the birds to some.

In the meantime, the elk have come back to calve. We have to be careful to stay out of some brushy steep areas the cows have chosen.